The Literate Yat

There is something to learn with every corner and page you turn.  Many of these books are just that– experiencing through listening and interacting.  You can learn about New Orleans’ past or participate in her present using these resources.

 

Chocktaw Tales, collected and annotated by Tom Mould showcases oral traditions and history of the Mississippi Band of Chocktaw Indians.

 

Gumbo Ya-Ya, Folktales of Louisiana by Saxon, Dreyer and Tallant was written as part of the WPA’s Louisiana Writers’ Program.  This is a wonderful collection of New Orleans and Louisiana history, traditions, culture, habits and stories as documented based on interviews of the locals in the late 1930’s

 

The House of Dance and Feathers by Ronald W. Lewis is presented by UNO’s awesome Neighborhood Story Project.  Mr. Lewis has a Mardi Gras Indian museum in his backyard in the Lower 9th Ward.  We can learn about his collection of artifacts, memories and experiences before, during and after Katrina.

http://www.unopress.org/content2/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=109:hodf&catid=107:nsp&Itemid=466

 

Louisiana Rambles, Exploring America’s Cajun and Creole Heartland by Ian McNulty breaks down all the fun adventures to be had in our fine state outside of The City.  Ian is a well-known writer in NOLA with a beautiful and articulate way of drawing you into his experiences.

http://www.louisianarambles.com/

 

Louisiana’s Comprehensive Plan for a Sustainable Coast published by the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority of Louisiana.  A master plan written in 2012 to save Louisiana’s coast from the sea.

 

New Orleans, The Underground Guide, A Music and Art focused Guidebook… (and the title goes on and on)by Michael Patrick Welch is not only jam packed with great advice on where to go and what to do, but is a fun-tastic, quirky read all on its own.  You just need to see this one for yourself!

http://www.unopress.org/content2/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=95:new-orleans-the-underground-guide&catid=103:general-titles&Itemid=466

 

Patriotic Fire, Andrew Jackson and Jean Laffite at the Battle of New Orleans by Winston Groom.   Recommended by a lovely guest that joined us for a paddle, this is one of the most fun non-fiction books ever!  Even though we know what happens next, it’s impossible to put down!

http://www.winstongroom.com/

 

Time and Place in New Orleans, Past Geographies in the Present Day by Richard Campanella.  Tulane professor, brilliant writer and lecturer, Campenella helps us understand exactly how New Orleans landed in this seemingly unlikely location and how it has developed throughout the years.  Though plenty of data is presented in this book, his smooth writing and illustrations through maps and charts make for an enjoyable and informative read.  There are lots more where that came from!

http://www.richcampanella.com/


Up Front and Center, New Orleans Music at the End of the 20th Century by Jay Mazza was released during our spring festival season.  How appropriate considering its content!  Jay gives us all kinds of good history and stories of Jazz Fest, music venues that have come, gone, and still exist, musicians that have influenced our music scene and the nation’s.

http://www.jaymazza.com/

 

“This is Your Brain on Nature: When we get Close to Nature–be it Untouched Wilderness or a Backyard Tree–we do our Overstressed Brains a Favor.”
Story by Florence Williams, Photographs by Lucas Foglia
Published December 8, 2015 by National Geographic Magazine
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2016/01/call-to-wild-text

 

“Why Paddle the Mississippi River?”

Three Part Series written by Chris Wolf E. Staudinger. Photos by John Ruskey.
November, 2013 by Canoe & Kayak Magazine

Why Paddle the Mississippi River— Part 1: The Bluffs

Why Paddle The Mississippi — Part 2: International Appeal

Why Paddle the Mississippi River — Part 3: The Mystery

Mapping the Lower Mississippi Water Trail